Category: Festivals and Conferences

RATMA Film Festival 2015

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Therese Balantine (left) and Saoirse Doyle having a mother-daughter chat in AN UNSEEN BIRTHDAY (Ireland/Germany 2014), one of the films screened at RATMAFF 2015

I wrote in detail about this local Yorkshire festival with a global reach last year. I enjoyed that visit so I returned this year. As far as I can make out there were less films screened this year but the standard was just as high, possibly higher overall even though I didn’t find the one standout film that so impressed me last time. With 50 short films in the programme I managed to see 19. An innovation this time was the switch to ‘mixed’ programmes in each of the seven screening rooms (three of which were deemed ’15+’ to give viewers some guidance to suitability). The ‘certification/advice’ idea is a good one but for me personally the mixing of animation, drama, science fiction, documentary etc. in the same programme was a bit of a pain. However, I’m not the target audience and there seemed to be more people viewing the programmes (and they were a more diverse audience) than last year. The festival screens the winning films voted for by festivalgoers in various categories at Keighley Picture House in the evening.

In terms of the films themselves, they seemed to be from a similar range of sources – though this year I was more aware of multiple entries from a handful of filmmakers. The interesting point remains that most of the films come from Europe, especially Spain. The film I enjoyed most was Desintegración by Álvaro Martín. This satire about the current economic crisis in Spain imagines an Orwellian future (in beautiful black & white) in which children are bought by the government or put out on the streets tied up like a dog and hoping for pity. You can see this film on Vimeo (but without the subs unfortunately). My selection also included films from Italy, Ireland and Israel, Germany, Estonia, Portugal, Poland and Croatia plus the UK, Australia and the US. (It’s strange that there are no shorts from France.) Most of the filmmakers appear to have been trained and to have started their own companies and Vimeo accounts where examples of their work can be found. Whether this means they are no longer ‘amateur’ is an interesting question. Most of the information about the films I found through online searches. RATMAFF is organised by a college lecturer and staffed by volunteers with funds raised going to Cancer Research UK, so I’m not complaining. Well done to everyone I say. Putting foreign language films before the good people of Keighley is a public service and I hope they can carry on offering a diverse programme for many years.

Here are Vimeo links to two more of the filmmakers featured at the festival:

Pedro Santasmarinas (Portugal)

Olga Guse (Germany)

About a Girl (Germany 2014)

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There are not that many screenings of German films these days, so this title in the Leeds Young Film Festival looked promising. It amply repaid the time at the Picture House. The Festival Brochure recommends:

See this if you liked: Heathers, Girl Interrupted, Juno.

In fact the last title is nearest in tone: a fresh and engaging look at a moment (a sort of rite de passage) when a teenage girl finds herself re-examining life, family, relationships and the larger meanings. In some ways the film seems blackly comic, as one of its main themes is ‘death’. However, this is contrasted with ‘life’ and the drama is not only affirming but is more questioning than sardonic.

The protagonist is fifteen and three quarter years Charleen (Jasna Fritzi Bauer). She lives with her mother Sabine, (Heike Makatsch, her nickname from her own teens is Bini); her younger brother and internet savvy Oscar; her granny Emmi (Dorothea Walda, much sharper that she first appears; and Sabine’s boyfriend Volker (Simon Schwarz, sometimes called Holger). In the course of the film we also find out about her father (not around). We meet her school friend Isa (Amelie Plaas-Link). And several schoolboys including Linus (Sandro Lohmann). Apart from being bright at maths he appears to also be an amateur taxidermist.

The Festival Brochure reveals that:

One day she (Charleen) decides to commit suicide. Waking up in hospital after her failed attempt, both her, her family and her friends are forced to reassess their lives and relationships.

This takes up the rest of the narrative. In the course of this we meet an unconventional psychologist Dr. Frei (Nikolaus Frei). We visit a funeral parlour, Charleen’s school, and a cemetery. We also meet Dr. Frei’s talking Budgie and Linus’ pet hamster Archie. We listen in on school sex lessons and watch the dynamics of teenagers in this environment; including their tendency to cruelty.

All this is treated with a relatively light touch. The film does become more serious in the last 40 minutes or so, but even here the plot allows the odd moment of wit or whimsy. One sequence I enjoyed was a near accident as the driver took her eyes off the road: the wandering eyes of drivers always worry me in films. A subjective viewpoint is also introduced with Charleen’s momentary imaginings about friends and people she meets. Several of these have real panache.

One of the virtues of the film is the style. It is more naturalistic than realist. But the techniques used, which include a couple of overhead shots and a crane, a slight slow motion effect and a series of freeze frames, is always completely apt. I was especially pleased that the Steadicam shots did not attempt to emulate a handheld camera.

My sense of teenage years is now all down to memories: but I found the confusions and angst depicted completely convincing. The film does attempt to include possibly too many issues: we have a gay relationship. But even here it fits. The final resolution of the relationships is slightly pat, but seems to work.

It looks like the film does not have a UK distributor as it does not have a BBFC Certificate: the Brochure recommends 15. It is to be hoped that some bright company picks it up. It is a rewarding 104 minutes and with the right publicity should surely win an audience. The film is in colour, 2.39:1 and has English subtitles. Well spotted by the Festival programmers.

Director and Writers: Mark Monheim. Music by Sebastian Pille; Cinematography by Daniel Schönauer; Film Editing by Stine Sonne Munch; Casting by Stefany Pohlmann; Production Design by Cinzia Fossati, Christina Heidelmeier; Costume Design by Carola Raum. The film is in German with English subtitles: oddly, I could not find a German title for the film.

¡Viva! 21 #6: Latin American Cities on Screen

Medianeras (Sidewalls, Argentina 2011) – one of the films discussed by James Scorer

Medianeras (Sidewalls, Argentina 2011) – one of the films discussed by James Scorer

As part of the ¡Viva! Weekender, Cornerhouse also offered a ‘One Hour Intro’, ostensibly to complement the screening of María y el Araña but in fact also useful in thinking about the other two Latin American films screening at the weekend as well.

Dr James Scorer, Lecturer in Latin American Cultural Studies at the University of Manchester delivered a talk for exactly an hour, showing a multitude of clips and setting out some intriguing arguments in what was an entertaining and informative session.

James began with a statement that certainly made me think. Latin America is now the most urbanised region on the planet with 80% of the population living in cities and surrounding urban areas. Given that for many years the image of Latin America on screen often included the rain forests of Brazil, the Andes, the pampas of Argentina or the varied topography of Mexico, it is certainly worth considering just how many recent films have focused on urban life. James grouped films in terms of how they addressed the problems of rapid urbanisation and how these have produced shanty towns/favelas alongside modernist architecture and gated communities. Inequalities have helped to create criminal gangs and kidnappings. The transport problems and the lack of planning has produced an alienated workforce, broken up traditional communities and traditional communities etc.

Although I had seen several of the films used as examples, there were many others that I’ll certainly try to see. What struck me eventually though was that all of the examples pointed to universal problems with urbanisation. The same issues about crime, health etc. issues in shanty towns can be found in numerous Indian films (or in films set in Kenya or South Africa) and it also struck me that some of the stories were similar to those found in Italian films of the 1950s/60s as well as other European films. There are some specific differences in Latin America of course but the issues of migration, alienation, homelessness, public health etc. are pretty much the same everywhere.

This introduction has provoked me to think in some different ways about Latin American cinema and in the process it’s reminded me of what a rich film culture there is to discover. Roll on ¡Viva!’s Mexican weekender! (By which time it’ll be at HOME!)

The Film Hub North Roadshow

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This event was held at the National Media Museum as part of the Bradford Film Summit. The latter three-day programme did not seem to be that well publicised: I missed a couple of interesting looking events. Apparently there are newsletters that go round but I have only just discovered these.

The Roadshow bought together a number of voluntary and professional groups over a day to hear about and discuss film provision in Yorkshire. We had representatives from the National Media Museum, Cine North, the Film Hub, The Picture House Chain, Leeds International Film Festival, Mini Cine and the Pavilion Arts Project. Also I met people from film clubs and societies, a voluntary run cinema and several local exhibition projects. The day started with a networking session – i.e. socialising over teas and coffees. This gave us a chance to say hello to people, offer introductions and find about a bit about what people did. There is actually a wider range of film projects on the ground than one realises. Chris Fell later mentioned fifty projects or venues in Leeds with whom the Film Festival liases. So one came away with a larger picture of film going ‘up north’.

We then had a series of talks, mostly illustrated by short films or film clips. The first three were members of a Film Hub set of advisers, available with particular expertise for projects. There was Katherine Penny at the Media Museum, Jen Skinner with Reel Solutions and Michael Wood from Mini Cine. At the moment they mainly provide advice on aspects of business and fundraising, audience development and programming.

Then Katherine Penny talked about the Bradford Animation Festival and six short animated films that are available for screenings in 2015. In fact we had a chance to see all six later. There is quite a varied selection, a couple are suitable for children and a couple are definitely adult. My favourite was The Elephant and the Bicycle (France/Belgium 2014, Cert. U), a moral tale with a nice sense of visual humour. The most impressive was Hipopotamy (Poland, 2014, Cert. 18), beautifully drawn but fairly enigmatic. The whole DCP or DVD runs for about 50 minutes.

We had a nice lunch and later Chris Fell, Director of the Leeds International Film Festival, talked about their Short Film City Project, which enjoys funding from the Film Hub North. Chris showed us a couple of examples from 2014, including the winner of the Audience Award. In fact a number of the Short Films at the Festival have been reviewed on this Blog. Chris talked in particular about the difficulties in developing audiences for Short Film programmes. The project, with partners, is ongoing. I have to say that the best examples at the 2014 Festival offered more in 15 or 20 minutes than one gets from some 100-minute features.

Will Rose from the Pavilion Arts Project talked about two films commissioned by them: 9 Intervals and Letter to the Editor of Amateur Photography. Both these have been reviewed on this Blog. The latter was screened recently at the Rotterdam International Film Festival; and is set to appear in Glasgow and New York. Will received a bursary from Film Hub in order to attend the event.

Chris Bate from the Film Hub North rounded off the presentations by highlighting the support that can be offered to film projects. Their new Website goes up very shortly and there are links to funding and bursary opportunities, and a regular newsletter. There was more networking over tea.

The day ended with a presentation from Picture House of their forthcoming release Dark Horse. This is a feature-length documentary due for release in April this year, [reviewed elsewhere].

At the moment the Film Hub North is linked via the Sheffield Showroom, but its own new site should be up soon.

http://www.showroomworkstation.org.uk/info/filmhubnorth