Category: Festivals and Conferences

CRIME: Hong Kong Style

Andy Lau threatened by Tony Leung in an iconic scene from Inernal Affairs, one of the films in CRIME: Hong Kong Style

Andy Lau threatened by Tony Leung in an iconic scene from Inernal Affairs, one of the films in CRIME: Hong Kong Style

HOME in Manchester is on a roll. With the last weekend of its excellent Jim Allen-scripted film season still to come, we now have the announcement of an extensive Hong Kong Crime Fiction season running during February, March and April. CRIME: Hong Kong Style is also a touring programme showing at various venues around the UK. It’s supported by the BFI and Lottery Funding as well as the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office. The programme is produced by Rachel Hayward and Jessie Gibbs and curated by Andy Willis. If it is as good as their recent programmes for ¡Viva! this should be a must see. As well as the films there are several events, including film introductions, illustrated talks and Q&As presented by Andy Willis, HOME Visual Art Director Sarah Perks, HOME’s local Chinese cinema scholar Felicia Chan and Wong Kar-Wai scholar Gary Bettinson.

The films are organised into different groups, sometimes by director, sometimes focusing on stars or writers, sometimes by production period or around more specific themes such as Hong Kong’s influence on Hollywood directors. The earliest film is The Swallow Thief from 1961 and the programme includes the UK Premiere of Ringo Lam’s Wild City (2015). The stars include Jackie Chan, Sandra Ng, both Tony Leungs, Andy Lau and many more. Each film appears to be showing only once (but I need to check that) at HOME. Check with your nearest venue for the films in the touring programme (see the HOME website for a list of venues).

Andy Lau and Maggie Cheung in As Tears Go By

Andy Lau and Maggie Cheung in As Tears Go By

The first Manchester screening (on 35mm, celluloid fans) is Wong Kar-Wai’s As Tears Go By (1988) with Introduction by Gary Bettinson at 18.15 on Thurs February 4th. Wong Kar-Wai’s début film is a gangster flick with a romance element. Still in the early parts of their careers, Andy Lau and Maggie Cheung are the cool guy and his beautiful cousin, while Jacky Cheung plays the hot-headed junior partner who keeps needing to be kept out of trouble. IMDB suggests Maggie Cheung had 11 (!) films released in 1988, including Police Story 2 with Jackie Chan. The original Police Story (1985) screens on February 25th at HOME. These films need to be seen on a big screen.

I hope to catch some of the screenings and events at HOME and to write about them here.

My favourite films in 2015

Timbuktu

Timbuktu

This was quite a good year for new releases. The best, for me, were as follows: in the order that I saw them:

Selma USA 2014.

A model of what a biopic should be and combining intelligence with mainstream production values.

Mummy Canada 2014

The film’s intensity was increased by the use of an unusual aspect ratio.

Phoenix, Germany 2014

A great combination of noir and Kurt Weill.

Bande de Filles (Girlhood) France 2014

A pleasure to watch, but serious with it.

A Pigeon sat on a Branch and Reflected on Life (En duva satt på en gren och funderade på tillvaron) Sweden, Norway 2014.

The film manages to be both droll and surreal at the same time.

Timbuktu Mauritania 2014

The first intelligent film about jihadists and the best football sequence in years.

45 Years UK 2015

Slow, elegant and very complex: the acting performances of the year.

Taxi (Taxi Teheran) Iran 2015

Subversion was rarely so witty or so much fun.

The Assassin (Nie yin Niang) China, Taiwan, Hong Kong 2015

Slow and with a tricky plot, but visually and aurally stunning.

Carol USA 2015

What other praise than this is as good as the Patricia Highsmith original novel.

Best Animation:

Song of the Sea Eire 2014

Beautiful traditional animation: lovely dog.

White God

White God

Best Canines:

White God (Fehér isten) Hungary 2014.

The largest and the most impressively led pack of dogs seen in ages.

Best Documentaries:

National Gallery, France, USA, UK 2014

Frederick Wiseman’s typical and completely absorbing portrait of a British artistic institution.

Letter to the Editor of Amateur Photography, UK 2013

The pleasure of watching radical documentary form: unfortunately it has had only a limited screenings.

Best wedding on film:

Wild Tales (Relatos salvaje) Argentina 2014

The best portmanteau film of the year and my most hilarious moments in cinema.

Most impressive silent film, by a narrow margin:

Les Misérables France 1928

MISERABLES_05

This screened at Le Giornate del Cinema Muto in a fine restoration, which ran for six hours: about the time you needed to read part one of the book.

Best film accompaniment:

This was the Benshi, Ichiro Kataoka, who accompanied Chuji Tabinikki / A Diary of Chuji’s Travels (Japan, 1928) along with the Otawasa Ensemble. This was another fine restoration also screened at Il Giornate del Cinema Muto.

Best early sound film:

Tell England UK 1931 screened at the British Silent Film Festival and demonstrated that how well some filmmaker used the new technology.

The film most worth waiting for:

The Promised Land (Ziemia obiecana) Poland 1975.

Director Andrzej Wajda’s epic of C19th capitalism in Łódź. And the series of Polish classics, partly organised by Martin Scorsese, was excellent.

The worst films that I sat through this year – a tie between,

Eisenstein in Guanajuato, Netherlands, Mexico, Belgium, Finland, France 2015

Steve Jobs USA 2015.

Both films had proficient technical aspects but both were idiosyncratic biopics, which showed little interest in the situation of the subject.

2015 in the cinema

GIRLHOOD – my most viewed film of the year.

GIRLHOOD – my most viewed film of the year.

Here are the ten films, released in UK cinemas in 2015, that I enjoyed most or which made the most impression on me this year. I’ve placed them in alphabetical order:

Carol (UK-US-France 2015)

Girlhood (France 2014)

Mia Madre (Italy-France 2015)

OK Kanmani (India, Tamil 2015)

Phoenix (Germany 2014)

Piku (India, Hindi 2015)

Taxi Tehran (Iran 2015)

Theeb (Jordan 2015)

Timbuktu (Mauritania-France 2014)

West (Lagerfeuer, Germany 2013)

Because this is a list of ‘most enjoyed’, it’s obviously a list reflecting my taste. Although only one title was directed by a woman (Girlhood), four films could be described as female-centred melodramas, two as romance/family dramas, two as political ‘statements’ and just one as an ‘action narrative’ – and Theeb is an action adventure from a young boy’s perspective.

Half of the ten films above are  films that I have introduced, discussed or formally taught this year. Girlhood stands out as I saw it four times on four different cinema screens in the space of a year, as well as studying several scenes in detail. Each time I watched it I got something new from it. I also presented and discussed Ex Machina for students and it proved a good choice for a student event, provoking an interesting set of questions.

I don’t rank or ‘grade’ films since this seems a pointless exercise, based on a wide range of criteria that aren’t applicable to every film. There are several films that I missed which may well have appeared on my list. In my part of West Yorkshire we get most film releases but not all and I can only get to Manchester or Sheffield occasionally rather than all the time. I’m most sorry to have missed Alexei German’s Hard to be a God and several of the Polish classics in the touring season.

Even though more and more documentaries are released in cinemas each year, I tend to see only a handful. Amy has appeared in many end of year lists and I can understand why. For my own part, I need a documentary to offer three very different pleasures – an interesting subject, an aesthetic approach that works and a filmmaker whose viewpoint I can appreciate, even if I don’t agree with it. That’s a tall order and the nearest to meeting it this year was probably The Salt of the Earth.

I did watch some American films this year including Mad Max: Fury Road and Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2. I did enjoy both screenings, partly because of the public debates about the films and at the time I felt engaged by the debates – but the films themselves didn’t make a lasting impression. Spy proved to be good entertainment for a night out. But the best American films I saw tended to be archive films or restorations. Missouri Breaks surprised me and my love of Westerns is still there. Can I bring myself to spend three hours with Quentin Tarantino next month?

I only managed four festivals this year, all in the UK. Glasgow Film Festival was very enjoyable and most of the films I saw eventually got a UK release (except the Chinese films). I only made two films at Leeds and Crow’s Egg did get a very limited UK release (six screens) and perhaps should have been in my list of ten. ¡Viva! was in three parts this year and proved as fascinating as usual – but sadly Spanish and Latin American films rarely get a UK release. Travelling to Manchester to see these films, and often to listen to the directors, remains a surreal experience and the failure of UK film culture to properly embrace the films is a continual disappointment. Much the same can be said for the excellent films that turn up each year at the London Film Festival and rarely screen anywhere else in the UK. Thirst and Arianna were the two films that really stood out for me. What I’ve missed, most of all, is my local festival in Bradford. Will we ever get it back? It makes a mockery of Bradford’s title as the first ‘UNESCO City of Film’.

2015 has ended very badly for me. The triple whammy of Spectre, Hunger Games and Star Wars has driven out virtually every foreign language film (apart from Indian films) from UK cinema screens. It’s Christmas and I can’t find anything locally to go and see. Radio 4’s Film Programme on Christmas Eve was depressing with three guests giving each other DVDs of their pick of the year’s films as Christmas gifts. Predictably all were American. Only Francine Stock’s championing of Girlhood prevented me from switching off the programme. With the ‘awards season’ coming up and the prestige US pictures replacing the blockbusters, January also promises to be grim – but Hou Hsiao-hsien’s Assassin is due for a UK release. Even so, I think I’m going to be watching more DVDs in 2016.

29th Leeds International Film Festival

LIFF Catalogue 2015

The picture  shows the cover of the Festival Catalogue with a still from North (Nord, Norway 2009). This was a droll and rather oddball comedy with deadpan humour. It was part of the Arctic Encounters programme. This year’s Festival had fifteen days of film screenings and events. I found this a strong and varied programme. There was a wide range of films, most were interesting, many were of high quality and there were only a few turkeys. Of course, I only saw a limited part of the Festival, but Roy has also posted on films here, and I spoke to  friends, volunteers and audience members. Generally people were very positive. They also gave me quite  a lot of recommendations, some of which I saw, some of which I hope to catch on release.

There are not any figures for attendances available yet. But overall they appear to compare well with previous years. As usual there were films that were packed out; hence I missed some. And there were also screening where there was a small coterie of film lovers. The Festival asks audiences to mark [actually tear a sheet] films on a score of 1 to 5. They are then tabulated with some sort of allowance for audience size etc. So below are those that won plaudits: the Festival Webpage is still up and titles can be checked there.

Audience award and winner :

New Narrative Feature

  1. Liza, the Fox-Fairy

  2. In The Crosswind

  3. Assassination Classroom

  4. Brooklyn

  5. Embrace of the Serpent

  6. Victoria

  7. Green Room

  8. Crow’s Egg

  9. Taxi Tehran

  10. Carol

My favourites were Taxi Teheran above, Our Little Sister and The Assassin. Meanwhile, Brooklyn, Victoria and Carol all have UK distributors.

New Documentary Feature

  1. Landfill Harmonic

  2. The Wanted 18

  3. Warriors

  4. 4. Do You Own the Dancefloor?

  5. Black Roses: The Killing of Sophie Lancaster

The Wanted 18  was the best documentary for me but I also really liked Abandoned Goods.

Retrospective Feature

  1. Leon

  2. Leeds on Film

  3. The Thing (+ John Carpenter Interview)

  4. The Iron Giant

  5. Sugar Cane Alley

For me the outstanding film was Pyaasa (Guru Dutt’s Hindi classic from 1957). And, but for a clash, I would have re-seen Letter Never Sent (Neatpravinnaoe pisma), a dense expressionist Soviet film directed by Mikhail Kalatazov in 1960.

Short Film

  1. Madam Black

  2. You

  3. Clumsy Little Acts of Tenderness

  4. Stutterer

  5. Life with Herman H Rott

My favourite short film was the Polish film Gigant. This year though I did not see a complete programme of short films so I can only note the awards that went to a really extensive selection of films.

I do also have my own categories.

The Silent film that I most enjoyed was Would You Believe it!, a British film from 1929 directed and starring Walter Forde, a popular comic of the period. It has a great staircase sequence and enjoyed an excellent piano accompaniment.

And the Canine film of the Festival was By Dogsledge Across Alaska. This was a Danish film (Med Hundeslaede gennem Alaska 1926) filmed by Leo Hansen. Unfortunately we only had a digital copy but there was live musical accompaniment. But the stars were the huskies who battled the arctic terrain and endured the foibles of their human masters with real patience.

And the most banal film was Eisenstein in Guanjuato (2015) scripted and directed by Peter Greenaway. Greenaway is an acquired taste, I have enjoyed some of his films. This must be his worse. The central performance is over the top, the film extracts are reframed to the wrong ratio, there is a pot pouri of techniques and little sense of the film Eisenstein worked on, Que Viva Mexico!

The Festival has a range of venues, sixteen in all. These range from actual cinemas to local Arts Venues, local Educational Institutions and a Unitarian Chapel, [which was surprisingly ornate and warm). The pride of place remains for me the Hyde Park Picture House with both digital and 35mm. The Cottage Road also has these facilities but only hosted a couple of films. The Victoria at the Town Hall has a large and impressive screen, but the dialogue is partly muffled in the hall: fine for music and effects. My biggest bugbear remains the Everyman, actually a video lounge. Unfortunately several film were programmed only in that venue: so I have to hope I will catch them elsewhere.

Now we have eleven months before the next Festival: though there are occasional screenings during the year in the Town Hall. There is a faint hope that we might again see a Festival at Bradford’s National Media Museum. Or even that the long awaited visit by the British Silent Film Festival to the North will happen.