Category: Anniversaries

My favourites from 2014

Winter Sleep

Winter Sleep

I thought the year was less productive and interesting than 2013: however I had a lay-off of nearly two months and missed a number of new releases. The ones that really impressed me this year were:

Winter Sleep / Kis uykusa Turkey / France / Germany, 2014.

For me not just the best new film this year, but the best for several years. Nuri Bilge Ceylan and his team have produced a long, but richly complex film. One that reflects on the personal and the social. Despite comments by some critics this is a splendidly cinematic film.

Ida, Poland, Denmark / France / UK, 2013.

An absolute pleasure in black and white academy ratio. Director Pawel Pawlikowski and cinematographers Lukasz Zai and Ryszard Lenczewski have produced a visually stunning film. The cast are excellent. What also impressed me is that the film not only achieves the look 1960s Poland but also of the Polish cinema of the period.

The Patience Stone, France / Germany / UK / Afghanistan, 2012.

This film had one of the outstanding performances of the year from Golshifteh Farahani. The screenplay, from the director Ayiq Rahini’s own novel, by Jean-Claude Carriére suggests he is still the finest writer in European cinema.

Golshifteh Farahani in The Patience Stone

Golshifteh Farahani in The Patience Stone

Concerning Violence, Sweden / Denmark / Finland / US / Norway / Germany.

This was an outstanding documentary, which showed proper respect for the archive material that it used: something that many films do not. The structure and editing of the film by Göran Hugo Olsson and his team was exemplary. The treatment of the writings of Frantz Fanon was somewhat partial, the most serious failing in the film.

The Missing Picture, France / Kingdom of Cambodia, 2013.

This was another exceptional documentary though its politics were less fully developed than in Concerning Violence. Rithy Panh’s direction and design was powerfully evocative: and the use of models and dioramas gave the film a very distinctive form.

Set Fire to the Stars, UK.

A last minute addition: 2013 ended with a film about a sculptor, 2014 with one about a poet. Beautiful wide-screen black and white cinematography and a fine sound design and music score, (director Andy Godard, Cinematography Chris Seager, Music Gruff Rhys). It also rescues the poetry of Dylan Thomas from its rather facile treatment in Interstellar.

The 20th (and possibly the last) Bradford International Film Festival gave me the discovery of the year – a retrospective of the films of Japanese director Nomura Yoshitarō based on the writings of Kobayashi Mosahiro. I especially liked the 1958 Stakeout (Harikomi) with my favourite Takamine Hideko in a leading role.

Takemine Hideko in Stakeout

Takemine Hideko in Stakeout

The Festival also provided a welcome retrospective of British director Sally Potter.

The 28th Leeds International Film Festival provided the best UK retrospective of the year – five films by the Swedish director Ingmar Bergman in 35mm prints. Included were his masterpiece Persona (1966) and the equally fine Through a Glass Darkly / Såsom I en spegel, 1961.

The Festival also provided the most challenging screening of the year – an immaculate print from the Netherlands Film Museum of Max Ophuls’ 1936 The Trouble With Money. Unfortunately the print had no English subtitles: it says something for Ophuls skill as a director that I could follow most of the plot.

Il Cinema Ritrovato 28th edition offered a film that I have waited long to see in its full format. As part of The Golden 50s: India’s Endangered Classics the Festival screened, in a black and white 35mm CinemaScope print, Kaagaz Ke Phool / Paper Flowers, 1959. One of Guru Dutt’s memorable melodramas with very fine cinematography by V. K. Murthy and music by S. ED. Burman.

kagaz-ke-phool

The Festival also screened the best digital restoration and screening I saw this year, a 4K version of John Ford’s classic My Darling Clementine, 1946. The ample Arlecchino cinema was packed for the occasion.

The best offering from the silent era was at [predictably] the 33rd Le Giornate del Cinema MutoThe Silent Comedies of Yakov Protazanov unfortunately listed as Russian Laughter rather than the correct Soviet Laughter.  I especially enjoyed The Trial Concerning Three Million / Protsess o Trekh Millionakh, 1926.

The nadir of 2014 was February, which saw the release of The Wolf of Wall Street, US. I can understand it being the most plagiarised film of the year but found it unaccountable that it was in the Sight & Sound ‘top listings’. There have been recurring traces of misogyny in the films of Martin Scorsese and this seems to me to be the worse example.

Then it was joined by The Book Thief, US / UK, 2013. Markus Zusak’s novel is an exhilarating and formally audacious piece of writing. The film version reduced it to the worse sort of mainstream conventions.

Finally, notable centenaries. The Hyde Park Picture House passed one hundred years – November 1914. The team still manages a pretty varied programme of films and also we enjoy fairly frequent 35mm screenings.

And then this was the anniversary year of Charlie Chaplin, first appearing in February 1914. I saw a considerable number of Chaplin films during the year, the one I most enjoyed revisiting was Modern Times, 1936. The screening at the National Media Museum was enhanced by a clip from the delightful Cuban film For the First Time / Por primera vez, 1967.

Cottage Road Cinema 1912 – 2012

Cottage Road Cinema – exterior

The Cottage Road Cinema opened on 29th July 1912. It is situated in the Leeds suburb of Headingley and when it opened there were about twenty-two film theatres in the city. By the height of the sound era the city had sixty-eight cinemas. Now the Cottage remains one of only two traditional cinemas in Leeds. Its 100th birthday was celebrated on the last Sunday in July with the erection of a ‘Blue Plaque’ and a special ‘classic’ screening. The event was assisted and supported by the Far Headingley Village Society who also produced an illustrated history of the cinema by Eveleigh Bradford.  The event was opened by the current proprietor Charles Morris, who owns and runs a chain of six independent cinemas in Yorkshire and Cumbria, Northern Morris Associated Cinemas. It is a sort of antique cinema ‘Roadshow’: The Plaza, Skipton and The Rex, Elland both also opened in 1912, [though only the Cottage and the Plaza have been exhibiting continuously]. And then the Picture House in Keighley has its own anniversary during 1913. The celebration also included short speeches from the staff and the Society, ending with a celebratory poem for the Centenary.

The actual screening commenced with a selection of Cinema advertisements from the 1950s and 1960s – including familiar names like Omo and Persil, but with a variety of other firms, including local businesses and holiday resorts. There were also Ministry of Information shorts from the 1940s, featuring the Crazy Gang and Charlie Chester. And some more recent adverts parodying film s like High Noon and Zulu. The patina of time gave these shorts clips an attraction and humour that contemporary clips lack.

The main feature was the 1967 black and white comedy The Smallest Show on Earth. The film was produced by Michael Relph and Basil Dearden. Early in their careers both had worked at the famous Ealing Studio, and the touch of that Production Company was replicated, with the small independent Bijou Kinema taking on the large and posh Grand Cinema. The two stars Bill Travers [Matt] and Virginia McKenna [Jean] played a middle class couple who inherits the Bijou from eccentric Uncle Spencer.

The film really takes off in the second reel when they [and we] see The Bijou and meet the Kinema staff – projectionist Quill played by Peter Sellars, the cashier Mrs Thazackalee played by Margaret Rutherford, and doorman/janitor Old Tom played by Bernard Miles. These three character actors are in their element and wring much humour from the state of the building, the equipment and the archaic management. When Matt queries complimentary tickets in exchange for a donation of a chicken, Mrs Thazackalee responds ‘well you can hardly send a third of a chicken to the Chancellor of the Exchequer.”  [A reference to the then contemporary Entertainment Tax].

The Bijou Kinema – interior

The Kinema itself is a beautiful piece of design and construction: with a baroque interior, dust and cobwebs everywhere, delightfully old-fashioned projectors and the exterior topped by a constantly askew sign. For the filming a façade was erected in Kilburn alongside an actual Railway Bridge. The interiors mixed studio sets with an actual contemporary cinema. And the rival Grand used the exterior of a Gaumont Theatre, then one of the major film circuits. All this was the work of Art Director Alan Harris and his team and the film was photographed by Douglas Slocombe.

The eccentric ways of the staff are beautifully counterpoint by the cinema audiences who suffer the travails of the screenings. They are realistic enough to be believable as a mainly working class audience in the late 1950s: but just enough over-the-top to be delightfully funny. The best sequences are when Matt and Jean attempts to improve the finances by ‘encouraging’ refreshment sales’. The screenings within the film appear to be from some actual B movies, westerns, but there is also a desert adventure which looks like it was specially shot for this feature. I thought I remembered an arctic adventure scene, but that did not appear in this print. The finest sequence is a private screenings by the staff of Cecil Hepworth’s Coming thru’ the Rye (1923) with Mrs Thazackalee accompanying on the piano. A lovely touch of nostalgia. Another fine moment is the end of a screening when the audience rushes for the exits in order to escape the National Anthem: only a lonely Quill stands to attention.

Inevitably the Grand stoop to skullduggery, but we know that the small guys’ will surely win through.

Sunday’s screening had an intermission halfway through the film, a traditional device in cinemas to bump up sales of soft drinks and ice creams. However, given the plot line of the feature this seemed quite appropriate. The screening of a worn but fairly good 35mm print was fine.

A great evening. The whole event was enjoyed by an almost capacity house (it seats 468), who applauded the introduction, applauded the advertisements, and finally applauded the feature. Hopefully the Cottage Road Cinema will survive to add to its long career.

There is more on the Cottage Road Cinema WebPages including a download for the illustrated history: other events are promised to follow:see http://www.cottageroad.co.uk/centenary.php