2017 in Review

I did not think that this was a great year for new releases. There were some very fine films, though often one had to seek them out.

I thought that the Palestinian film 3000 Nights / 3000 Layla (2015) was a powerful portrait of the effects of occupation.

Certain Women (2016) was another fine film from Kelly Reichardt with four excellent performances.

I am Not Your Negro (2016) was a very good documentary though I thought it was weakened by not directly addressing James Baldwin’s homosexuality.

After the Storm / Umi yori mo mada fukaku (2015) was another fine family drama from Kore-eda Hirokazu.

Dunkirk, Christopher Nolan patriotic epic, is here in its 70mm/IMAX version: a true cinematic experience.

Sally Potter’s The Party was one of the wittiest films of the year, standing out from some of the more heavy-handed satires.

Happy End was typical of Michael Haneke and of equal quality to his earlier films.

And Mountains May Depart (2015) was a distinctive but finely made Chinese drama.

Praise for Casey Affleck in Manchester by the Sea (2016) and for  Sallie Hawkins in Maudie (2016).

The year was improved by quite few classics re-exhibited and/or in Festival programmes. However, some of these were transferred to digital formats and that is a lottery for viewers. So I seek out those on 35mm prints.

Odd Obsession / Kagi (Japan, 1959] was a discovery, a sardonic family drama from Ichikawa Kon.

Humanity and Paper Balloons / Ninjô kami fûsen, directed by Yamanaka Sadao in 1937, was a film I knew of but only now had the opportunity of seeing: it has one of the great endings in world cinema.

West Indies (1979) is Med Hondo’s exhilarating take on slavery, the African Diaspora and European racism.

And one film that transferred to digital with such care and attention that it retained its cinematic qualities was The Bride of Glomdal / Glomdalsbruden, directed in 1926 by Carl Theodor Dreyer.

I was fortunate to see Sergei Eisenstein’s Alexander Nevsky / Aleksandr Nevskiy (USSR, 1938) in a nitrate print which gave a luminous edge to the famous ‘battle on the ice’ sequence’.

At the opposite end of the scale there were a number of filmic duds but the title that seemed the most interminable was The Killing of a Sacred Deer, directed by Yorgos Lanthimos. Interesting directors from national cinemas tend to lose that interest when they move into English-language International co-productions.

The wooden spoon goes to The Lost City of Z (2016). It was a rare 4K DCP distribution but the files that I saw included digital break-up and colour distortion. Friends had the same problem with different exhibitors. But the distributor Studio-Canal, declined an explanation for this.

But equally reprehensible is whoever controls the policy at the BFI of access to archive prints. I saw both Battleship Potemkin / Bronenosets Potemkin (USSR 1925) and The End of St. Petersburg / Konets Sankt-Peterburga (USSR 1927) in 35mm prints with excellent musical accompaniments, but the prints were copies of sound transfers rather than the proper silent prints with the correct frame rate and framing. Lenin’s adage about cinema clearly falls on death ears despite the Centenary of ‘The Great October Revolution’.

‘Waiting to see …’

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One comment

  1. John Hall

    To these I would add the Russian film ‘Loveless’, premiering at the Leeds Film Festival as did the equally gripping ‘Cold Skin’. Loveless was an unflinching look at the disappearance of an unwanted child and its aftermath. Also much appreciated by me was the reissue of ‘The Sorcerer’ from William Friedkin, a film that got lost on its initial release possibly owing to the contemporaneous release of ‘Star Wars’.

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