Electric Dreams #1: The Hood Maker (UK-US 2017)

Richard Maddern and Holliday Grainger are cop and ‘teep’ in THE HOOD MAKER

The first of the adaptations of Phil K. Dick short stories was something of a disappointment for me. I’d read that the changes made to the narrative were only minor but in fact they are fundamental. Does it matter? I’m not sure. The adaptation is by Matthew Graham who wrote the ‘going back in time’ TV seriesLife on Mars and Ashes to Ashes in the 2006-10.

The ‘Hoods’ of the title are protection for ordinary citizens who don’t wish to be ‘probed’ by telepaths (‘teeps’) working for the government in this alternative future. The hoods are not yet illegal but an ‘Anti-Immunity Bill’ is in the works which would mean refusal to be probed (to prove ‘loyalty’) would become an offence. Dick was writing in the early 1950s and created the ‘teeps’ as the children of parents affected by a nuclear explosion.

The major change in the adaptation is to shift the narrator character from an older man who receives a hood and becomes an unwitting tool of the ‘rebels’ to the pairing of a police ‘Clearance’ officer and his teep partner. In the original, the teep is male but in the adaptation she is female. The other change is in the presentation of the alternative world. Dick barely describes his worlds in the early stories, but they are easily imagined as rather sterile cities and their suburbs not dissimilar to Eisenhower’s America of the 1950s (these are also the settings for Dick’s non-SF novels). Since the film adaptation that became Blade Runner (1982) the ‘dystopian city of the future’ seems to have become a standard presentation. In this new adaptation there isn’t the budget to go the whole hog so we get an odd mash-up of architectural styles and 1960s/70s cars. The ad breaks also featured a trailer for the Blade Runner sequel due out in a couple of weeks – a truly Dickian touch. But I do worry that Ridley Scott’s conception is pushing out Dick (Scott is the Executive producer of the new film directed by Denis Villeneuve but he seems to have a major say in the look (and music) of the new film).

The result of the changes eventually leads us into an emotional relationship between cop and teep (similar to blade runner and replicant?) which makes this quite a different narrative to the original. Dick’s sympathies are clearly with the rebels but the new version makes the police officer more sympathetic and the teep’s motives are more difficult to understand. Dick’s 1953 story ends with a certain twist which was then traditional in science fiction. The ‘threat’ to humanity from a teep takeover is ended by something simple and central to the teep’s existence – so the effect is like the common cold contracted by the Martians in the War of the Worlds and also like the problems of humanity in Children of Men. The new version has an ‘open’ ending – again a Blade Runner link? I think that it is actually more powerful to contemplate the incipient fascism of suburban 1950s America than to create Ridley Scott-type dystopias.

Holliday Grainger and Richard Maddern are good leads (and Grainger copes well with the hair and make-up) but I struggled to hear the dialogue – I recorded the show and I should have thought about subtitles. The next episode in Electric Dreams is based on an even shorter story (10 pages) with a single narrative enigma. I wonder how that will be extended? I’m going to record all the episodes and then perhaps make a final judgement.

One last point – I’m happy to greet the next reviewer who refers to Dick adaptations as ‘sci-fi’ with a metaphorical ‘slem gun’ blast (the weapon used in these early 1950s stories). It’s SF or science fiction!

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2 comments

  1. keith1942

    ‘sci-fi’. I have never seen a ‘slem gun’.!
    I have not read the Dick original but Roy sound about right on this.
    It was like someone had transferred Scott’s ‘Blade Runner’ to a new setting.

    • Roy Stafford

      A Slem-gun appears to melt or dissolve anything thing/person it strikes – reducing them to fragments according to the story. That’s contradictory of course since fragments imply an explosion, but then PKD was never really interested in this kind of thing, he just needed the weapon to speed up the narrative by removing characters quickly.

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