Favourites from 2016

The outstanding film - Our Little Sister</i

The outstanding film – Our Little Sister

This was not the greatest year for new releases but there were some fine and powerful dramas and documentaries. One positive aspect was that nearly half the films that I saw at a cinema were on 35mm. Less positive was for D-Cinema; only 4 or 5 DCPs were in 4K; this despite distributors bragging on a many occasions that the source was a ‘4K restoration’.

New releases:

Our Little Sister / Umimachi Diary (Japan 2015).

This was a sheer delight: one of the best films of the decade.

Dheepan (France 2015).

A fine and socially conscious drama, combining realism and imagination.

Son of Saul / Saul fia (Hungary 2015).

Rarely have I experienced such intense drama: a European Holocaust film with real substance.

Taxi / Taxi Teheran (Iran 2015).

Simple, actual, funny and fascinating.

Victoria (Germany 2015).

Impressive use of digital technology and the style completely fitted the drama.

Documentary:

The Pearl Button / El botón de náca (Chile, France, Spain, Switzerland 2015).

Visually superb and politically sharp.

Performances:

I enjoyed Amy Adams in the fine science fiction film Arrival (Canada, USA 2016). And Nellie’s cross-gender performance as Marvin in Paterson (USA 2016) certainly deserved the Palm Dog: unfortunately posthumously.

A fine restoration in 35mm:

Kean / Edmund Kean, Prince Among Lover / Kean ou Désordre et Génie, France 1924

Restored by the Cinémathèque française with tinting restored by Náradni filmavŷ archiv.

rr_03b_kean

An impressive preservation of a film print:

By the Gosfilmofond of a nitrate print of Ramona (USA 1927) and screened at the George Eastman Nitrate Weekend.

Two great discoveries of the Year:

A Japanese Tragedy  / Nihon no higeki (1953)

At the Sheffield Showrooms, a rare Japanese film drama.

Laughter in Hell, USA 1933.

Effectively a pre-code movie and the most intense and brutal chain-gang film that I have seen.

Special commendations:

For the Parkway Cinema in Barnsley for screening The Hateful Eight (USA 2015) from a 70mm print in the full 2.76:1 ratio.

The Cinémathèque française deserve a further commendation: a friend told me that they declined to licence a theatrical screening of a title sourcing digital video.

The worst film:

London Has Fallen (UK, USA, Bulgaria 2016).

In my defence there was a dearth of interesting titles that week.

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