LIFF 28 #2: When Animals Dream (Når dyrene drømmer, Denmark 2014)

Lars Mikkelson as the father with his daughter Marie

Lars Mikkelsen as the father with his daughter Marie

Nordic noir crosses over into Nordic Gothic? Here’s a film which sounds like it might be following Let the Right One In but in fact turns out to be more like a Nordic Ginger Snaps (Canada 2000).

Marie is a young woman living in a small fishing town on Denmark’s North Sea coast (it was filmed iThyborøn). Although the houses look as if they were built in the 1950s or 1960s, the locale is presented in a subdued palette and accompanied by mists in CinemaScope compositions which suggest timeless images of desolate coasts and stormy seas. Marie’s father is the ever reliable Lars Mikkelsen and her mother is another Danish film and TV regular Sonja Richter. Marie and her father take turns acting as nurse for her disabled mother who needs a wheelchair and help with eating and personal care. Marie visits a doctor with minor symptoms of something she doesn’t understand and she is a little alarmed/disturbed by his detailed examination and promise of another appointment. She is about to start work at the fish-processing plant, the only significant employer in town. Inevitably there are young men who want to tease her and others who want to date her. Soon, however, it is apparent that the attention she receives is more than most new young employees might experience.

Marie shows her father that she is not prepared to be kept in seclusion.

Marie shows her father that she is not prepared to be kept in seclusion.

When Animals Dream is a genre film and it runs a modest 84 minutes. It doesn’t manage the complexity and rich layering of meanings achieved by Let the Right One In. Nor does it manage to harness another genre like the youth picture in the same way as the excellent Ginger Snaps, even though it does use adolescent desire as part of the narrative. I enjoyed the film, especially in its use of the location which is redolent of so much Gothic horror (as well as very different kinds of drama such as Babette’s Feast which shares a similar location). Partly, the problem is that werewolf stories conventionally require a number of ‘transformation’ scenes in which the central character has to metamorphose before us, putting pressure on budgets for make-up and special effects – which for me never do very much. I think this film would have been greatly improved by less effects work and more focus on the various narrative strands. One promising narrative begins to uncover what happened to Marie’s mother and how it came to be that her ‘disease’ was contained. There could also have been some development of Marie’s relationships with a couple of the young men.

On the positive side, the performances of the leads are excellent and Sonia Suhl who plays Marie is believable as Sonja Richter’s daughter. There were moments when I wasn’t quite sure if it was mother or daughter. The best scenes are those when Marie and her father have to confront the townspeople – all of whom seem to know the secrets of Marie’s family. Here the film moves into the territory of ‘small town classic drama’.

Not much has been written about the film yet but I noted another example of a trend which seems to be developing – beating up on your own film industry. One Danish poster on IMDB condemns foreign critics who gush over the film when from his Danish perspective this is just another example of a poor Danish film. The same poster in effect repeats the Swedish argument about horror films – i.e. Scandinavian audiences are so familiar with American and British horror that they see their own as inferior. I think they are wrong to do so but I’ve given my reading above. When Animals Dream is a debut directorial effort by Jonas Alexander Arnby from a script by Rasmus Birch. Birch has a track record but Arnby has nothing listed for the last 10 years before this film (when he worked as an Art Director and short film director). The budget for When Animals Dream is listed as €4 million which is much more than most UK horror films get. The money has been well-spent on the look of the film, but perhaps more of it should have gone on script development?

Despite my reservations, I think this is definitely worth seeing (the ending is quite gory if that is your interest) and it has been acquired for UK distribution by Altitude Films.

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2 comments

  1. Sam Broadhead (@Samheadart)

    I saw this film at LIFF 2014. There was a sequence, early on, where the camera surveyed the sweep of her back muscles as she was on the point of changing. I thought the director was going to evoke her transformation through the clever use of movment, light and shade rather than by make-up and special effects. I was disappointed that this approach was not taken further. There were a couple of points in the action that reminded me a litttle of Tourneur’s cat people (1942), which I think is still a wonderful film.

    • Roy Stafford

      I agree. I thought of Tourneur as well and I think an approach like that of Val Lewton’s unit at RKO in the 1940s could still work well in contemporary cinema. The director seems to be trying to achieve something through mise en scene and lighting but is perhaps constrained by worries about the budget and audience expectations.

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