Bright Days Ahead (Les beaux jours, France 2013)

The lovers seen through the blinds

The lovers seen through the blinds

The ironic English title of this film refers to the name of a social club with a range of classes and workshops for retirees. Caroline (Fanny Ardant) is given a trial membership by her daughters when she is more or less forced to retire from dentistry aged 60. (Her husband carries on working, even though he is a few years older.) The French title translates as ‘The Beautiful Days’ – perhaps ‘Golden Days’ in English? The novel by Fanny Chesnel has a title which translates as ‘The young woman with white/grey hair’. I mention these different titles since the nuanced differences between how we might interpret them gives a clue to the difficulty of pinning down the tone of the film. As baby-boomers age they inevitably create new categories/genres – as a ‘cohort’ with more expectations than previous generations and often more resources to deploy. There have been several films in the last few years that reflect this social change. UK cinema has produced The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel and Quartet both played mostly as comedies with underlying dramas. A Song for Marion then developed a twist on the May-December romance. All three UK films have a kind of populist ‘feelgood’ factor about them. Do we expect a French take on the issue to be less sentimental and more aspirational?

In the UK/US film culture older actresses have sometimes (quite reasonably) complained about the limited roles available to them. French female stars of a certain age have had other opportunities similar to that opened up for Fanny Ardant here. Charlotte Rampling springs to mind in more than one film. Our expectation is that these glamorous stars will remain so after 60 and Fanny Ardant certainly fits the bill. Her Caroline quickly falls for the attractive IT teacher running the ‘silver surfers’ workshop. Not quite 40, Julien offers what the BBFC warning (for a 15 film) describes as ‘strong sex’ and Caroline responds. What will happen when her husband finds out – which he surely will since Caroline is anything but discreet? How will the 30 plus daughters react?

The story is set in Dunkerque and the sometimes rainy and chilly Nord-Pas-de-Calais coastline offers an interesting backdrop to what in some ways is quite a conventional romance. The windy beaches, the rain, fairground rides and big skies all seem to offer some kind of referent to the state of the romance. They also help to provide scenarios for how the story might end. The director and co-writer (with the novelist) is Marion Vernoux, who has made similar films that I don’t think I’ve seen. She has an excellent cast with Patrick Chesnais as the husband and Laurent Lafitte as the lover. I’m not sure that the story alone would have held me without a central performance as strong as that from Ms Ardant who is completely convincing. A key moment for me was when Caroline referred to the expectation that the ‘right thing’ to do for a relatively affluent retired dentist was to offer her services to  voluntary groups helping those less fortunate. “But, I want to live” she tells Julien. I’m not sure why that line made such an impression, but possibly it just made her less ‘admirable’ and perhaps more human so that I felt for her as she drank too much and became vulnerable. That dilemma about wanting to ‘give back’ something to society but also wanting to enjoy freedom and independence is something many people over 60 experience (assuming that they have enough income to make the choice realistic).

Bright Days Ahead is only showing twice at Hebden Bridge Picture House and it got a smaller audience for the first screening than is usual for Hebden. That’s a shame. This is the kind of adult romance that UK filmmakers find difficult to make (though there are as good and arguably better narratives of a similar kind on UK television).

Export trailer (with English subs) from Unifrance:

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